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A Window to Our World: Our One Shot to Make a Difference

Here at The Style Line, we believe that personal style,

creativity, and storytelling are key ingredients in building a diverse, inclusive and positive community. We launched this series to provide a space for our growing global community to come together and share how their unique endeavors are contributing to some of the world’s bigger conversations. As we continue to navigate the now uncertain territory that comes with this post-election age we promise to continue celebrating the stories of those who are making the every day mean something. Today’s feature speaks more to this idea.

In the age of filters and feeds, we asked four collaborators,

interviewees and friends of The Style Line to document last weekend’s Women’s March on Washington in an honest, candid and completely unedited way. The four dynamic women featured in this story embody our mission as they are true champions of merging style, creativity, and ethics. We’re honored to have them share tangible memories captured before, during and after the march and even more importantly, their plans to make tangible change within their respective communities. As a digital generation, we may only have one shot to take a timely photo, but we recognize that there are many opportunities to come together and create impact that will last a lifetime – these stories are only the beginning.

Read on to meet Daniela, Rose, Robin, and Bridget who share a window to their respective worlds and their advice for the next generation of creatives who are looking to leave an imprint in the world simply by doing what they love.

DANIELA SPECTOR, PHOTOGRAPHER

I’m Daniela Spector, a photographer based in

Long Island City, NY. I enjoy obsessing about things I can’t control and singing Aretha Franklin in the shower. I value hard work and empathy in myself and others.

GIVE US A WINDOW TO YOUR WORLD. WHY ARE YOU MARCHING AND PERHAPS MORE IMPORTANTLY HOW DO YOU HOPE YOUR EFFORTS TODAY TRANSLATE BEYOND THE IMMEDIATE COVERAGE/TIMING SURROUNDING THE INAUGURATION? 

I marched because I’ve never felt so unrepresented, disrespected or shocked by an administration and their policies more than I have with the incumbent. I felt as if I didn’t have a choice but to march. I’m hoping that the march and the immersion into the community who attended and whose ideas mirror my own will spark a flame in myself and my peers to take action over the next four years. Inspire us to make an actual difference.

AS CREATIVES, BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS AND MODERN WOMEN WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON THE SYNERGY BETWEEN ART AND ACTIVISM AND WHAT ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR THE NEXT GENERATION IN TERMS OF LEAVING AN IMPRINT IN THE WORLD SIMPLY BY DOING WHAT THEY LOVE?

Being able to express my angst towards the current state of affairs through photography has been surprisingly gratifying. During the march, I gravitated towards the little girls and boys perched on their parent’s shoulders, holding signs in protest. I’ve since looked back on those photos and have been emboldening to educate myself on ways to fight and ensure there’s a better future for them.

“This year we have one shot to stay woke.”

ROSE MAYO, MARKETING + PR PROFESSIONAL

I’m Rose. I do marketing/PR in the fashion and lifestyle

spaces with a side job in beverage/hospitality PR, but my interests reach far beyond that. When I need to de-stress or clear my head, I like to garden and bake; two hobbies I inherited from my childhood with my (amazing, strong) mother. I prefer a few well-balanced cocktails and endless engaging conversations and debates in a dark, hard-to-find bar over well drinks at a packed club, though both tend to end in late nights when they happen. I’ve found my values and my “wants” changing more rapidly in recent years; I’d rather have great experiences than things (a trend among millennials, as those of us who work in product-based industries, have learned the hard way), but I feel it becoming more of an ongoing part of my life than a trend. I’m in a position where I can give back in some way, a little bit monetarily, even more so with my time (I’m a regular volunteer with an animal rescue), and most of all, with my voice. I think it’s important to have an opinion and beliefs about nearly everything, and if you don’t have them yet, to educate yourself enough so that you DO form an opinion. You’re not going to change anything, in your life or in the world around you, with apathy.

GIVE US A WINDOW TO YOUR WORLD. WHY ARE YOU MARCHING AND PERHAPS MORE IMPORTANTLY HOW DO YOU HOPE YOUR EFFORTS TODAY TRANSLATE BEYOND THE IMMEDIATE COVERAGE/TIMING SURROUNDING THE INAUGURATION?

I spent a lot of time thinking about this before heading to D.C. to march; so much so that I even wrote a short piece over on Medium about my reasons for participating. I grew up in Des Moines, where politics are front and center every few years as the parade of presidential candidates roles through before we hold the first caucus in the nation. As a child, no one in my family was what I’d call politically active, but I remember my mom always going to vote at the church up the street from our house on election days, and I went to school with children of local politicians who would come to events and games and all that, so there was always some chatter about it around me. Most of my family is pretty liberal, as were my friends around me, and I grew up in a very open-minded and diverse community. It’s always made sense to me that basic human rights should come before fiscal concerns because if we are not taking care of each other the “state of the economy” is a moot point. I marched because of these and other beliefs, but also because I feel it’s incredibly important to be present and active, not passive, in your life and the way you want the world around you to be. You can type your feelings upon a screen and post them to social media, but that’s not going to change the community around you. You’re speaking to a bubble, and being passive.

Being physically present, and using your voice to connect with the people who have the ability to make changes is far more important. I’m certainly guilty of Facebook rants and passive sub-tweets as much as the next person, but I’ve made it a personal goal and challenge to do more than that (which I used to, as a teenager—before social media!).

I’m already signed up with some small community groups, have made plans to go with a friend to his democratic reform club’s next meeting, and want to continue to make calls and in 2018 and volunteer with a politician I support. I’ve made a list of organizations I support and hope to make donations to in 2017, and if possible donate some of my time, too. These aren’t even all political; some simply help out people who need it, like homeless outreach and humanitarian groups. My hope is that my small changes and actions will encourage the people around me to do more, too.

AS CREATIVES, BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS, AND MODERN WOMEN WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON THE SYNERGY BETWEEN ART AND ACTIVISM AND WHAT ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR THE NEXT GENERATION IN TERMS OF LEAVING AN IMPRINT IN THE WORLD SIMPLY BY DOING WHAT THEY LOVE?

I think we, as women, owe it to ourselves, our friends, our moms and grandmas and ancestors, and those yet to come to tell our stories, through art and business and activism and community.

It serves no one when we stay quiet about our feelings and experiences, but when we talk about them there’s a chance we’ll change someone’s perspective or let them know that someone else has experienced the same thing.

I don’t know a single woman who hasn’t experienced harassment, abuse, intimidation, or discrimination because of her gender. Race and gender identity play an even deeper role in discrimination and harassment; using our voices (especially those of us who are white, cisgender women) to say hey, I am not OK with this, I will not stand by and let you treat me this way, I will not watch someone else suffer out of fear for speaking up, is equally important. I hope we are able to further advance the incredibly important role women play in our society and show the next generation that they can empower themselves and they don’t need someone else’s validation. We are each enough, and when we come together, there is really nothing that can stop us from advancing change.

“This year we have one shot to be an active participant for the change we wish to see.”

BRIDGET BADORE, PHOTOGRAPHER + TEACHER

Hi, I’m Bridget Badore! I’m a full-time photographer and

I also dabble in teaching. I’m a proud feminist who has taken a long and awkward road to get where I am now. I come from a very small conservative town in the center of New York State. I’ve always been weirdly proud of my upbringing but this election has unearthed some complicated feelings. Anyway, outside of photography, I enjoy cuddling with my cat, making lists, and talking about feelings… haha, I know that sounds silly when I type it out but I feel so full after a good conversation with anyone about what’s making them tick. I think vulnerability is so important.

GIVE US A WINDOW TO YOUR WORLD. WHY ARE YOU MARCHING AND PERHAPS MORE IMPORTANTLY HOW DO YOU HOPE YOUR EFFORTS TODAY TRANSLATE BEYOND THE IMMEDIATE COVERAGE/TIMING SURROUNDING THE INAUGURATION?

Our president can’t speak so carelessly about women and minorities and not expect us to react; we need to resist the bullying behavior. Now that he’s in office, we also need to actively resist his dangerous policy and general belief system (like trying to quiet the media and press). I think that the biggest result of the march efforts will be the echo that resonates afterward, through conversation, awareness, and visibility. I believe that the march was an entry point for a lot of people, and now they’re looking for more opportunities to speak up and make a change.

AS CREATIVES, BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS AND MODERN WOMEN, WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON THE SYNERGY BETWEEN ART AND ACTIVISM AND WHAT ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR THE NEXT GENERATION IN TERMS OF LEAVING AN IMPRINT IN THE WORLD SIMPLY BY DOING WHAT THEY LOVE?

Art plays a big role in activism because sometimes just being yourself feels like an act of resistance. Literally being your best self is one of the best things you can do. When you’re honest and genuine about who you are, it sets an example for everyone around you. Authentic and vulnerable people are some of the best role models.

I’ve felt inspired to work on projects or speak out about issues just by seeing other people share their honest experiences. Once you find what you love to do and what you’re good at, continue to use your skills to empower yourself and others.  As a white woman, I need to try harder to challenge my own comfort and question my own norms. We have one shot to prove that this march wasn’t just a selfie contest and that we are going to keep showing up. You can start as small as calling your local representative to make your voice heard about an issue that matters to you, or making an effort to follow more women of color and trans women on Instagram or Twitter to get new perspectives in your feed.

This year, let’s be more intentional with every choice we make. keep marching. Keep listening to the people around us who are scared, hurting, or undervalued. Keep learning from each other.

“This year we have one shot to elevate the voices that need to be heard.”

ROBIN REETZ, FASHION EDITOR + WRITER

Outside of my profession, I’m an Atlanta gal based

in Brooklyn who loves her dog, traveling, and watching (good!) movies and TV. I value equality, generosity, basic decency, and kindness. I love strong women and the men who support them.

GIVE US A WINDOW TO YOUR WORLD. WHY ARE YOU MARCHING AND PERHAPS MORE IMPORTANTLY HOW DO YOU HOPE YOUR EFFORTS TODAY TRANSLATE BEYOND THE IMMEDIATE COVERAGE/TIMING SURROUNDING THE INAUGURATION? 

There’s been a lot of talk about checking your privilege since the election and that’s definitely something I’ve been looking at since November 9th. As a white, middle-class woman living in a space where I can safely and comfortably protest with a family that supports and encourages me to do so, I feel I have a duty to fight harder than I have before for my rights as a woman, but more so for the women who have been marginalized far more than I ever have or am likely to be. I have a duty to stand up, fight back, and organize, and that’s this march was just the beginning of that.

AS CREATIVES, BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS AND MODERN WOMEN WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON THE SYNERGY BETWEEN ART AND ACTIVISM AND  WHAT ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR THE NEXT GENERATION IN TERMS OF LEAVING AN IMPRINT IN THE WORLD SIMPLY BY DOING WHAT THEY LOVE?

A lot of people think of activism and feel like it’s not for them. In the same way that the old ideas of feminism keep some people associating any kind of feminism with old ideas of bra burning and not shaving your underarms (both of which are great if that’s your thing – you do you!), there seems to be a general thought that activism means aggressively running through the streets, smashing windows, and literally fighting for what you believe in.

In reality, activism can take multiple forms and I advise anyone who is looking to get involved to think about what they can do on an everyday basis start there. Maybe it’s literally supporting a cause through a message on a t-shirt or tote bag, maybe it’s helping friends register or inviting them to come with you to a community town hall meeting, or maybe it’s using your social platform to educate others on the causes that are important to you. Whatever it is, the most important thing isn’t how you act but that you act – and act often.

“This year we have one shot to fight together.”

FOLLOW EVERYONE FEATURED HERE ON INSTAGRAM @DIRTYYYDAN @ROSAMAPOSE @BRIDGETBADORE AND @ROBINREETZ

A Window To Our World began as space for commentary from our growing global community surrounding the events of the 2017 presidential election. As a result, this series now features stories and accounts from our interviewees on how they are changing the current political, social, and environmental climate… for the better.