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Éva Goicochea Makes a Case for Minimalism

STORY + VIDEO EDITING BY RACHEL SCHWARTZMANN – FOLLOW EVA –  PHOTOS + FOOTAGE BY BRIDGET BADORE FOR THE STYLE LINE

Éva Goicochea understands the power of design. Her

penchant for minimalism, coupled with her eye for style has informed her many successful professional endeavors in the fashion, technology, and wellness industries. Eva’s thoughtful approach has also translated into the making of her beautiful (and perfectly minimal) home – case in point, today’s story with Éva who kindly invited us to experience a morning in her world.

Nestled in the heart of Greenpoint, Brooklyn, we were immediately in awe of the assemblage of beautiful objects throughout Éva’s home (all of which we found to be a testament to her undeniable taste for simple and well-made things). It also doesn’t hurt that her adorable dogs, and cats, added a lively energy to the mix.

While there, we also lost ourselves in the shelves of art books, admired the many plant-laden corners (which added new life to the neutral-heavy color palette that was present throughout), and soaked up the warmth emitting from the large windows – and from Éva herself. After a full tour of the airy space, Éva enthusiastically brought us up to speed on life in Brooklyn, her passion projects, and her thoughts on the power of minimalism. As she eloquently stated in our interview below, “I find that simple design and messaging creates a sense of understanding and calm that has been the compass by which I guide my work and make my home.”

Without giving too much away, discover more from our time with Éva, featuring a more in-depth look at her space with exclusive photos (and video footage) captured by Bridget Badore for The Style Line.

Hi. I’m Éva Goicochea

and I spend a better part of my day explaining how to say my name. Actually, that’s not true. Who am I?  I’m a sixth generation New Mexican with a very long full name, the mother to four rescued pets, and a spouse to Ian.
Outside of work, which it seems is how I spend most my waking hours, I enjoy a quick trip to somewhere new, attempting to cook or run more, and mostly just spending my time annoying above said pets by hugging them and telling them how much I love them. Oddly enough, I also extend this behavior to every animal I come across and it’s a wonder that I didn’t become a zoo keeper. So the short of it is that I value all life. Each and every one of this world’s funny creatures.

We love your penchant for design and the fact that it inspires a sense of wellness. What role has this played in your life both personally and professionally? 

While deep down there is an inner runner in me (see above), my version of wellness does come out through taking time both on and off duty to create and appreciate design rather than through a daily ingestion of tonics—though I do love a good ginger shot. I find that simple design and messaging creates a sense of understanding and calm that has been the compass by which I guide my work and make my home.

Minimalism or simplicity seems to be at the intersection of both your personal style and endeavors. Would you agree? Why do you think this is an important or impactful way of living?

I do agree (though hopefully I’m not known as having a monochromatic sense of humor or imagination—yikes!). My minimalistic approach comes not from necessarily viewing it as a better way to live, but just as the way that I do best.

I multitask in life and in my work so much that I find myself more at peace when my surroundings are simple or I’m wearing a bit of a daily uniform. Don’t get me wrong: I went to FIT and I am fond of fashion, but I value timelessness as it gives you a chance to decide what is really important.

What are your thoughts on the synergy between fashion and interior style and do you feel you have a similar approach to both your wardrobe and interior preferences?  

Before I answered this question, I went through my closet and all I could find was a handful of color so I suppose I do believe in your closet is an extension of your interior style and vice versa. The common thread—no pun intended— is that I do equally look at form and function. Is it multi-purpose? Will it be useful in the future? All that said, I do believe in wearing clothing and creating spaces that fit within their geographical surroundings and if that means vibrant colors and intricate patterns, bring on the chartreuse.

From New Mexico to New York, how do you think your approach to living has evolved as a result of living in these two places?

The convergence of those two approaches to life—a slow pace surrounded by natural beauty and the city existence where you quilt a random assortment of experiences—are the two speeds I enjoy and value. I am happy being endlessly curious investigating the corners of the city and also quite content to just sit and stare at the stars for a bit. Both places are so very different, but they share a foundation built on art and culture and that’s where my interest in these things was shaped.

How would you advise the next generation to leave an imprint in the world simply by doing what they love?

In recognizing that your passion is probably shared, you can find a way to apply it to create a value and a solution in the world for some audience somewhere. Never think that what you do isn’t important. It is. And I bet with a bit of research and persistence, the entrance to that path will be clear.

“I find that simple design and messaging creates a sense of understanding and calm that has been the compass by which I guide my work and make my home.”