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A Window to Our World: Our 2018 Women’s March Meet Up

STORY + VIDEO EDITING BY RACHEL SCHWARTZMANN – REGISTER TO VOTE HERE – PHOTOS + FOOTAGE BY BRIDGET BADORE FOR THE STYLE LINE

On Saturday, January 20th, we organized an intimate group of The Style Line’s

interviewees, friends, and collaborators to meet up and march with us in honor of the Women’s March anniversary. The day began with coffee and conversation (along with some much-needed carbs) at Maman and provided the perfect foundation for us to catch up with our interviewees and facilitate introductions with the women in the group. From fashion to journalism to mental health, it was truly an amazing thing to witness women of different ages, backgrounds, and interests come together and champion one another on this momentous day.

One of the biggest takeaways for us was a question of whether or not it’s a challenge for The Style Line to keep up and remain involved in the big political conversations happening daily. To answer that question: Yes, it is. Without a doubt. But days like this remind us to continue to be intentional and to reinforce the relationships with the amazing community women we’ve been building over the last few years.

The events that have taken place over the last year also continually remind us to strive to do more, and we’re committed to our mission and bettering our growing global community through even more thoughtful storytelling – both online and off. Stay tuned for more on that coming soon.

In the meantime, thank you to the inspiring women who showed up on Saturday (and who show up, speak up, and try to make a positive impact) every day. Discover our full recap below which features insights from a few of the women who joined us, and enjoy exclusive photos (and film footage!) captured by Bridget Badore for The Style Line.

I’m Rose! Since last year,

my desire to impact my world has deepened, as my anger at the injustices (of both the last year and more) has solidified. I feel like I’ve become more aware of the ingrained responses we are raised to have – and the ones men are, too – that are detrimental to women and minorities. I’m much more aware of past experiences I had that made me angry or upset or uncomfortable but I didn’t give a voice to at the time, although I’m still figuring out the right way to respond to these things now that I’m more “woke” to them. It’s easier to do with people I know, but harder to do on a larger scale, especially as I am aware of the privileges I do have as a college-educated white person. Now, I feel like I’m struggling with how to listen and yet be a vocal advocate for those who need people like me to speak up; how do I do this while learning and without offending?

Give us a current window to your world. How are you feeling and why was it important to you to participate in the Women’s March? 

I’m still feeling angry, and I don’t think that’ll ever really go away.

It will take generations and generations for women and minorities to really be treated as equal – I don’t want to be naive enough to think that’ll actually happen in my lifetime. But I do have hope, and I see the conversation continuing to happen and evolve. Sometimes it’s not always for the “best” but the fact that we’re still having it at all means we’re doing something right. I do think that this year, I looked at a lot of people like, what else have you done in the last year since this happened? And I also ask that of myself. What am I doing, or able to do, that makes a meaningful, positive impact on lives around me (and not just politically!). This is something I’m still challenging myself on because I don’t feel like I did as much as I should have or could have or would have liked to have done over the last year. So, in 2018, I want to push myself a bit further.

What is one question you hope people ask you more often with regard to participating in events like the Women’s March?

What actionable steps can I take to make a positive difference for women and minorities?

How do you plan to tap into your style/creativity to make actionable changes in your community in the year ahead?

I have a personal fascination with identity and the events and choices that impact how each person defines it for themselves. I have a lot of ideas I want to expand on around this, many of them are art or photo/video or writing based, that I hope will continue to tell peoples’ stories and add something to the conversation. TBD on when I’ll get them all off the ground, but I want 2018 to be a year of action for me!

“Fashion is political. Who you wear and what you wear can make a difference and spark change. From purchasing clothing from women-run businesses to supporting companies that provide assistance and fair pay to women makers, you have the choice to put your money where the world needs it most. This year I hope to be a voice for those brands that are making meaningful and mindful impacts in their communities. I also want to dedicate more time to having political conversations, participating in more rallies and community events, and to submerge myself in the literature being written by authors and leaders who are at the forefront of this monumental movement.”

– Natalie Skoblow, Communications Coordinator at Housing Works

I’m Bianca Nieves.

Like so many other women, I’m tired. But that’s exactly why I wanted to participate in the Women’s March.

As a first-timer, I marched feeling utterly thankful for those who marched before me; I marched in solidarity with everyone who doesn’t  feel like the march includes them, and I marched to reclaim our space.

What is one question you hope people ask you more often with regard to participating in events like the Women’s March?

One question I hope people ask me more is, “Who do you march for?” Yes, I am a woman. Yes, I believe in the movement, but I’m overly aware that the movement, more often than not, doesn’t include all who want to believe in it. As a Latina, I want to help raise awareness of all those which our narratives exclude, like Afro-Latinxs, trans, queers etc. and I want to keep on educating myself and keep the conversation going since one can receive so many answers to that question.

How do you plan to tap into your style/creativity to make actionable changes in your community in the year ahead?

It’s no secret that I love thrifting, so in the year ahead I want to continue making it my main source of shopping. However, I want to really start investing in key pieces that I know will outlast my thrift store finds and search for them in my local community.

My name is Larissa May

(most people call me Larz). I am the founder of #HalfTheStory and now the Head of Content Marketing at Otherland. Since our the last feature, I have begun my official career in public speaking on the topic of the relationship between mental health and social media.

Give us a current window to your world: How are you feeling and why was it important to you to participate in the Women’s March? 

This is such an important time as a woman to stand up for humanity. One of the reasons I love New York is because of the incredibly supportive community of women. The march was a manifestation and reminder that we’re all in this together. I think it’s also important to recognize that this isn’t just about women, this is about all of the voices in our culture who have been silenced or underrepresented. Change is on the horizon.

What is one question you hope people ask you more often with regard to participating in events like the Women’s March?

How does marching drive change? What’s the bigger picture?

How do you plan to tap into your style/creativity to make actionable changes in your community in the year ahead?

My goal is to tie the message of action and give specific examples for the #HalfTheStory to participate in these conversations. I also hope to open up the platform to more multimedia contributions to provoke discussion about the political climate. I find it difficult to keep up with all of the topics in mainstream culture, but we need to hear about the POVs of our people, rather than rely on large media outlets to consume information.
“I was super bummed not to be able to participate in the Women’s March last year, so it was really important to me to be there this year. And, we were out in full force! It was such a powerful experience to see so many women (and men! and kids!) from all backgrounds come out for a common cause and raise our voices. I was so honored to be a part of it this time around and it’s a memory that will stick with me forever. The most important takeaway for me was to not back down. We need to take that same momentum we had at the march right to the polls and VOTE. And, we need to continue to use our platforms for good in the process and to help us get there.”

I’m Emily Drewry. I am the

social content manager at Forbes, where I help manage the flow of content between all teams at Forbes. I’m also the host of two video series, one weekly news show and an interview series with a focus on social good. My role is always changing and adapting, as the world of social media does, so no two days are the same.

Give us a current window to your world. How are you feeling and why was it important to you to participate in the Women’s March?

It wasn’t ever a question in my mind whether I should participate in the march or not—I was going to be there. Last year I had an important family occasion during the March that kept me away, but I still felt the power of the gather from miles and miles away. This year, I had to experience it for myself, to lend my voice to the chants, to represent everyone who’s suffering under this administration. I’ve found this past year to be especially challenging in terms of how I share my thoughts and feelings about the political atmosphere — it’s almost as if the more frustrated I get, the less I know how to express it.

I’ve felt similarly stuck in terms of how to make a difference—but knew that this march was the little bit I could do to be a part of the movement.

Give us a current window to your world. How are you feeling and why was it important to you to participate in the Women’s March?

I have participated in other marches (I led a walkout of my high school years ago to protest Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker) but it hasn’t been a major part of my life. I’d like to be more involved in activism initiatives because showing up is just the first step—so if I take that step, I’ll be prepared to take many more and begin to make a difference.

What is one question you hope people ask you more often with regard to participating in events like the Women’s March?

I hope people ask not just for the highlights and encouraging moments (of which there were many), but about the moments that were challenging. I hadn’t thought about counter-protesters, for example, but once we encountered them, it felt like I had overlooked an obvious part of political activism.
I wasn’t prepared for how to react, and I want to explore that feeling moving forward.

How do you plan to tap into your style/creativity to make actionable changes in your community in the year ahead?

Beyond getting more involved with organizations that are doing incredible work, I am trying to be brave enough to speak up in more challenging environments. I have family members whom I love very much but are very misguided politically, and I’ve been too terrified to try to communicate about what’s going on in our county. I know there is a more creative way to communicate my frustration that unplanned confrontation and I plan to challenge myself to find out what that is this year.

I’m Rachel Jones. Not much

has changed on my front other than feeling that January-level anticipation and laser focus for setting goals and initiatives for JONESY this year.

Give us a current window to your world. How are you feeling and why was it important to you to participate in the Women’s March?

As a first time marcher, I didn’t know fully what to expect but I was excited to be there. I was traveling last year so missed out on the NYC and DC marches and then experienced serious lifetime FOMO to realize this movement was happening and I wasn’t joining. At the same time, I wanted to make sure I was being intentional about why I was hitting the streets and what I was advocating for. This year it was important for me to show up and raise my voice to protest against sexual harassment in the workplace and rally around the #MeToo movement. I am very aware of how privileged I am and lucky to have not personally experienced some of these injustices, but I wanted to raise my voice alongside those who have. As someone who works in tech and fashion, this feels very close to my heart.

What is one question you hope people ask you more often with regard to participating in events like the Women’s March?

I’m not someone who’s typically very open about their faith and beliefs, but I would like to be asked about what I think about the Women’s March as a person of faith. As a Christian and someone who believes wholeheartedly that God has a heart for the marginalized and oppressed, I think it’s important for Christians to have a vocal and active role at these events. I know so many Christians who show up and advocate hard for these causes, but I don’t think most New Yorkers realize that.

How do you plan to tap into your style/creativity to make actionable changes in your community in the year ahead?

I feel that the internet (the bulk of where I spend my time as a brand founder immersed in the direct-to-consumer world) lends itself to a lot of talking and not a lot of listening.

I hope to practice more listening this year and feel challenged to think about ways to bring more inclusiveness to how I represent JONESY and grow the brand into more of a welcoming space.

I’m Bridget Badore. I’m the

lead photographer for New York stories for The Style Line and CONNECT(ED)ITORIAL. It feels like nothing and everything have changed. I’m still photographing, but photographing more of what I like and less of what I don’t. I’m still talking about feelings all the time. I’ve had a lot of growing pains and new challenges, but with every year I think we all settle into our selves more.

Give us a current window to your world. How are you feeling and why was it important to you to participate in the Women’s March? 

It was important for me to march to show that we’re still here, and we’re still growing. The women’s march encompasses a lot of ideas for a lot of people, and I think what’s been so amazing in the last year is that we’ve been continuing the dialogue and growing, individually and as a collective.

Last year I mentioned that I believed the march would be an entry point for a lot of people, and I think that was true. A year later, activism seems to be a much more common topic of conversation.I think we’ve all started to find the areas that we’re able to participate comfortably – whether it’s donating monthly to an organization that’s important to you, going to town hall meetings, showing up physically to protests and demonstrations, volunteering, creating spaces to facilitate dialogue, or actually running for office, and everything in between. I think 2017 was a big year for self-care – there was a lot of panic last January. Now we’re figuring out the best ways to show up, in the ways that make sense for our bodies and minds, however we can.

One big difference from last year, I think, is a sense of self-awareness. After last year’s march, a lot of women and femme individuals bravely came out and expressed why the Women’s March wasn’t for them. For me, it was so important to listen to those stories and become a more aware, inclusive, and intersectional feminist. I began checking how I consumed media – what podcasts, books, articles, music, and art was I consuming? Was it all made by people who look like me? How could I change that? Listening to other stories is so important.

What is one question you hope people ask you more often with regard to participating in events like the Women’s March?

What else are you doing? I think for some people, the women’s march might feel like a “one and done” thing, when the ideas we march for should really be permeating your life in other aspects. We should be asking ourselves, all the time, if our beliefs are in line with our day-to-day actions.

How do you plan to tap into your style/creativity to make actionable changes in your community in the year ahead?

I’m working very hard on channeling my own confidence so that I can better represent the type of woman I want to be in this world. I’m also working to create a style of living that allows for constant conversation and listening. I think keeping dialogues open about tough subjects is important to keep the conversation going.

Since last year, I feel like I’ve really stopped doubting myself and stopped letting my insecurities or ego get in the way of asking important questions. I think it’s really hard, especially for those who grew up in small towns with little diversity, like myself, to feel comfortable engaging in more active conversations. So often, the fear of “not saying the right thing” inhibits us from listening and engaging with those around us who might have differing opinions. I know that if even just a few young women are looking up to me, I need to be the best version of myself: honest, vulnerable, and empathetic.

A Window To Our World began as space for commentary from our growing global community surrounding the events of the 2016 presidential election. As a result, this series now features stories and accounts from our interviewees on how they are changing the current political, social, and environmental climate for the better.