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A Window to Our World: Elyse Fox of Sad Girls Club on Creative Storytelling and Honest Conversations

STORY + VIDEO EDITING BY RACHEL SCHWARTZMANN – FOLLOW ELYSESPECIAL THANKS TO HARVEY AT THE WILLIAMSBURG HOTEL FOR HAVING US – PHOTOS + FOOTAGE BY BRIDGET BADORE FOR THE STYLE LINE

Honesty, transparency, and creativity are the core pillars

that Elyse Fox has built her life upon.

As the founder of Sad Girls Club and Produced by Girls, Elyse has worked hard to create safe spaces for women to openly and unapologetically speak about mental health. Her efforts have already paid off in big ways as our featured interviewee has cultivated a strong, global community who have been able to come together and connect over their shared experiences. Not to mention, Elyse has made these topics even more accessible by using creative solutions to craft inspiring content, events, and initiatives that uniquely bring these stories to life. As she explained in our interview below, “As a new company, I have to constantly rethink how we communicate with our audience. That part takes a lot of experimentation and trial and error. I’m confident Sad Girls Club will continue the conversation about the importance of mental health through film, art, and collaboration.”

With the above in mind, we were honored to have the opportunity to chat more with this talented storyteller who kindly carved out some time in the midst of her increasingly busy schedule. Thanks to our friends at Harvey at The Williamsburg Hotel, we joined Elyse for a riveting conversation over breakfast where she gave us a window into her current world, thoughts on personal style and self-care, and her advice for the next generation of creative women. Discover our full conversation below, featuring exclusive and beautifully-captured moments from our time together captured by Bridget Badore for The Style Line.

Hiiii, I’m Elyse Fox.

A filmmaker and activist from New York. I enjoy debating minuscule observations with my friends and I value the pursuit of happiness and personal connections.

Congratulations on all that you’ve achieved with Sad Girls Club! We’ve noticed that many of your collaborations involve the fashion and creative industries. Why do you think it’s important for these communities to get involved in conversations around mental health?

Thanks so much. I think the topic of mental health awareness is a topic everyone should be discussing. I was really relieved to see huge fashion houses discussing mental health.

Personal style is a big lens that we use to tell our stories. How would you describe your relationship to personal style as it relates to your work, your wardrobe, and your community? 

I think your personal style is a way for many to deflect from what they may be feeling internally. I remember when I would feel my saddest I often wore darker colors/baggy clothes. Expressing myself through film has helped me become more vulnerable and Is definitely my ‘go-to’ platform for self-expression.

Give us a current window into your world: How are you feeling? How has the evolution of Sad Girls Club helped your own relationship to find happiness or fulfillment evolve? How does the community help get you through the days when you do feel sad?

To begin, I’m always tired haha. I love that my life has flipped from being depressed in bed to never having a free moment in my calendar. My work through Sad Girls Club has helped me learn what self-care means for me. I’ve evolved through educating myself about the various mental health issues that affect so many girls daily. I’m confident I can look to the community for tips and coping mechanisms that have helped them.

“My work through Sad Girls Club has helped me learn what self-care means for me.”

– ELYSE FOX

“I’m confident Sad Girls Club will continue the conversation about the importance of mental health.”

– ELYSE FOX

How do you hope your endeavors leave a long-lasting impact on women in this particular political climate?

I hope my work within the mental health world becomes the ‘norm’ for women. We all deserve to exam how we stand mentally, I hope these conversations become household/dinner conversations. During this time it’s important for women to practice solidarity, we’re all we have!

What is one question you wish people asked you more often?

How’s your mental health holding up?

How do you think creativity contributes to some of the world’s bigger conversations and how do you hope Sad Girls Club plays a role in this shift?

The way we consume information is completely different from five years ago, attention spans have become shorter, people absorb so much information it’s hard to track what’s being retained. As a new company, I have to constantly rethink how we communicate with our audience. That part takes a lot of experimentation and trial and error. I’m confident Sad Girls Club will continue the conversation about the importance of mental health through film, art, and collaboration.

How would you advise the next generation of women to leave an imprint in the world, simply by doing what they love?

Use your voice and hobbies to speak for issues that you’re passionate about. It’s always uncomfortable being the first to do something risky – but you never know who will be positively affected by your journey.

A Window To Our World began as space for commentary from our growing global community surrounding the events of the 2016 presidential election. As a result, this series now features stories and accounts from our interviewees on how they are changing the current political, social, and environmental climate for the better.